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After Minneapolis Pushes To Disband Police – The City Commission Steps Up And Blocks The Move
By Jackson Wright|August 7, 2020
After Minneapolis Pushes To Disband Police – The City Commission Steps Up And Blocks The Move

The “defund police” movement has been gaining steam across the country in recent months. After the George Floyd incident, calls for sweeping law enforcement reform started pouring in.

One of the first cities to consider actually disbanding their police department was Minneapolis. In fact, the city council reportedly pushed for the “abolishing” of the MPD.

But that push just hit a big roadblock in the form of the Minneapolis Charter Commission.

The City Council planned to put the idea of disbanding the MPD on the November ballot, with at least one council member claiming “the need to be protected from theft and violence was a form of privilege.”

However, this had to go through the Charter Commission — and the Commission just said no, due to a lack of planning.

Via The Daily Wire:

The Minneapolis Charter Commission brought city council efforts to defund and disband the Minneapolis Police Department to a halt Wednesday, refusing the council’s demand to place an initiative to ‘abolish’ the MPD on the November ballot and excoriating the city council over its lack of planning.

The city’s charter is clear:

It requires that Minneapolis maintain a police department with a minimum force based on its population.

But the City Council wanted to replace that requirement with a plan that would apparently “prioritize a holistic, public health-oriented approach.”

The problem was that they didn’t define this. They didn’t elaborate on what a “holistic, public health-oriented approach” would involve.

In response, the City Council tried to clarify its stance.

In a letter to the Charter Commission, the Council said:

The Minneapolis City Council is not asking you to put police abolition on the ballot, nor does the amendment propose this.

We are asking you to let Minneapolis vote on a new framework for public safety that aligns with the State of Minnesota’s Department of Public Safety.

Even so, the Commission didn’t agree with the city council’s plan. They ultimately voted 10-5 to keep the measure off the ballot in November.

And if the council doesn’t manage to make their plan clearer, and explicitly show and explain the details, the measure could fail entirely.

In short, the Commission believes the voters should have all the information they require. And in this case, they wouldn’t have gotten it.

Said Charter Commissioner Andrew Kozak:

We have an obligation to make sure that what is going on the ballot gives the voters an informed choice, that they can make a decision in a thoughtful way.

Key Takeaways:

  • The Minneapolis City Council moved to consider abolishing the MPD on the November ballot.
  • But the Charter Commission blocked the move, citing a lack of planning and details.
  • The city council clarified by saying they’re not necessarily pushing for abolition. However, the Commission believes there isn’t enough information for voters to make an informed decision.

Source: The Daily Wire

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Jackson Wright
Jackson Wright is a journalist, writer and editor with over two decades of experience. He loves writing, rowing, reading, video games, and to a certain extent, Objectivism.
Jackson Wright is a journalist, writer and editor with over two decades of experience. He loves writing, rowing, reading, video games, and to a certain extent, Objectivism.
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